Implied indemnity and the Inter-Club Agreement

 

When an owner settles cargo claims, is the Inter-Club Agreement (ICA) the exclusive means of seeking recovery from a charterer under a charter containing the ICA, or can recovery be made under the implied indemnity? This was the issue before the tribunal in London Arbitration 19/17. The head owners settled claims under the bills of lading in respect of condensation damage to a cargo of steel carried from various ports in China and Taiwan to Antwerp. The principal cause of sweat developing was the difference in the ambient temperature between the Chinese loading ports and the loading port in Taiwan. The head owners then recovered a contribution from the time charterers under the ICA which was incorporated into the charter, which was on NYPE form. The disponent owners then sought to recover the full amount of what they had paid the head owners from their sub-charterer. The sub charter was also on NYPE form incorporating the ICA. They claimed this by way of an implied indemnity, on the ground that the claims had arisen as a consequence of following charterers’ orders to load cargo into the same holds at different ports with varying temperatures, so resulting in the cargo sweat which damaged the cargo.

 

The tribunal rejected this claim on two grounds. First, the disponent owners had agreed to a voyage, which inevitably involved the possibility of loading cold cargo which then had to be carried through warmer waters to the destination and the risk of cargo sweat occurring was something the disponent owners had agreed to undertake. Second, for cargo claims the implied indemnity gave way to the express provision that cargo claims were to be apportioned between owners and charterers in accordance with the ICA. On the facts these cargo claims were subject to 50-50 apportionment under cl. 8(d).

 

 

Published by

Professor Simon Baughen

Professor Simon Baughen was appointed as Professor of Shipping Law in September 2013 (previously Reader at the University of Bristol Law School). Simon Baughen studied law at Oxford and practised in maritime law for several years before joining academia. His research interests lie mainly in the field of shipping law, but also include the law of trusts and the environmental law implications of the activities of multinational corporations in the developing world. Simon's book on Shipping Law, has run to five editions and is already well-known to academics and students alike as by far the most learned and approachable work on the subject. Furthermore, he is now the author of the very well-established practitioner's work Summerskill on Laytime. He has an extensive list of publications to his name, including International Trade and the Protection of the Environment. He has also written and taught extensively on commercial law, trusts and environmental law. Simon will be a member of the Institute of International Shipping and Trade Law, a University Research Centre within the School of Law, and he will teach on both the LLM (Carriage of Goods by Sea, Land and Air and Oil and Gas Law) and LLB programmes at Swansea.

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