A small step on the road to Rotterdam?

 

Two bills are currently before the Parliament of the Netherlands concerning the Rotterdam Rules  2008. The first would give the four separate components of the Kingdom of the Netherlands –  the Netherlands, Aruba, Curacao and Sint Maarten – the power to ratify the Rotterdam Rules and denounce the version of the Hague-VisbyRules to which they are party. The second would remove the Hague-Visby provisions of the Civil Code and replace them with the Rotterdam Rules which would be incorporated into it by reference.

The bills are expected to pass soon but this will not lead to an immediate replacement of the Hague-Visby Rules with the Rotterdam Rules. The explanatory notes to both bills state that it will be for the government to decide on the date of ratification and entry into force and this may depend on ratification of the Rotterdam Rules by neighbouring countries, such as Germany and France and major trading parties such as China and the US-  no mention is made of the UK.

 

 

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Professor Simon Baughen

Professor Simon Baughen was appointed as Professor of Shipping Law in September 2013 (previously Reader at the University of Bristol Law School). Simon Baughen studied law at Oxford and practised in maritime law for several years before joining academia. His research interests lie mainly in the field of shipping law, but also include the law of trusts and the environmental law implications of the activities of multinational corporations in the developing world. Simon's book on Shipping Law, has run to five editions and is already well-known to academics and students alike as by far the most learned and approachable work on the subject. Furthermore, he is now the author of the very well-established practitioner's work Summerskill on Laytime. He has an extensive list of publications to his name, including International Trade and the Protection of the Environment. He has also written and taught extensively on commercial law, trusts and environmental law. Simon will be a member of the Institute of International Shipping and Trade Law, a University Research Centre within the School of Law, and he will teach on both the LLM (Carriage of Goods by Sea, Land and Air and Oil and Gas Law) and LLB programmes at Swansea.

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