Good Lorde! A new transnational torte?

News last Friday that under the 2011 Law for Prevention of Damage to State of Israel through Boycott an Israeli Court has awarded damages of $19,000 plus costs against two New Zealanders who posted a tweet urging the popular chanteuse, Lorde, to cancel her planned concerts in Israel (which she did). The Israeli law is of universal effect. However, the judgment will not be enforceable in New Zealand which does not have a reciprocal treaty with Israel for recognition and enforcement of judgments and where the common law principle applies that absent presence by the defendant in the foreign state giving the judgment or submission to its jurisdiction the local court will not grant recognition to the foreign judgment.

The same would apply were a similar judgment to be given against UK tweeters. Although the UK does have reciprocal arrangements with Israel for recognition and enforcement of judgments under The Reciprocal Enforcement of Foreign Judgments Order (Israel) Order 1971 SI 1971/1039, the common law rule on recognition is applied in article 4(1). Additionally, article 3(4)(d) precludes recognition of a judgment which would be contrary to public policy.

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Professor Simon Baughen

Professor Simon Baughen was appointed as Professor of Shipping Law in September 2013 (previously Reader at the University of Bristol Law School). Simon Baughen studied law at Oxford and practised in maritime law for several years before joining academia. His research interests lie mainly in the field of shipping law, but also include the law of trusts and the environmental law implications of the activities of multinational corporations in the developing world. Simon's book on Shipping Law, has run to five editions and is already well-known to academics and students alike as by far the most learned and approachable work on the subject. Furthermore, he is now the author of the very well-established practitioner's work Summerskill on Laytime. He has an extensive list of publications to his name, including International Trade and the Protection of the Environment. He has also written and taught extensively on commercial law, trusts and environmental law. Simon will be a member of the Institute of International Shipping and Trade Law, a University Research Centre within the School of Law, and he will teach on both the LLM (Carriage of Goods by Sea, Land and Air and Oil and Gas Law) and LLB programmes at Swansea.

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