More Lex Brexitaria. CJEU OKs AG’s opinion.

The Court of Justice has just announced its decision in Wightman. It confirms the opinion of the Attorney General published last week that the UK is free to withdraw its article 50 notice before 29 March 2019.

In today’s Press Release it is stated.

“In today’s judgment, the Full Court has ruled that, when a Member State has notified the
European Council of its intention to withdraw from the European Union, as the UK has
done, that Member State is free to revoke unilaterally that notification.
That possibility exists for as long as a withdrawal agreement concluded between the EU
and that Member State has not entered into force or, if no such agreement has been
concluded, for as long as the two-year period from the date of the notification of the
intention to withdraw from the EU, and any possible extension, has not expired.
The revocation must be decided following a democratic process in accordance with
national constitutional requirements. This unequivocal and unconditional decision must be communicated in writing to the European Council. Such a revocation confirms the EU membership of the Member State concerned under terms that are unchanged as regards its status as a Member State and brings the withdrawal procedure to an end.”

Another instalment in the Lex Brexitaria is expected later today in the judicial review application concerning article 50 in the Administrative Court which was heard last Friday.

 

In the light of the judgment, the current Prime Minister Mrs May has made  a statement at 15.30 in which she  announced a delay to tomorrow’s meaningful vote in the House of Commons on the Draft Withdrawal Agreement. The Prime Minister hopes to use this delay to address the concerns of MPs regarding the backstop. She could start by getting them to read paragraphs 20 and 21 of the Attorney General’s advice which points out that Northern Ireland will be in a more advantageous position with the EU than the rest of the UK in the event the UK enters the backstop.

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Professor Simon Baughen

Professor Simon Baughen was appointed as Professor of Shipping Law in September 2013 (previously Reader at the University of Bristol Law School). Simon Baughen studied law at Oxford and practised in maritime law for several years before joining academia. His research interests lie mainly in the field of shipping law, but also include the law of trusts and the environmental law implications of the activities of multinational corporations in the developing world. Simon's book on Shipping Law, has run to five editions and is already well-known to academics and students alike as by far the most learned and approachable work on the subject. Furthermore, he is now the author of the very well-established practitioner's work Summerskill on Laytime. He has an extensive list of publications to his name, including International Trade and the Protection of the Environment. He has also written and taught extensively on commercial law, trusts and environmental law. Simon will be a member of the Institute of International Shipping and Trade Law, a University Research Centre within the School of Law, and he will teach on both the LLM (Carriage of Goods by Sea, Land and Air and Oil and Gas Law) and LLB programmes at Swansea.

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