“VACCESS”. That AstraZeneca contract – terms and conditions apply.

Following last week’s storm in a vaccine vial between the EU, the UK, and AstraZeneca, a redacted version of the contested contract was published last Friday. Here are the salient provisions, with cl. 18.7 being relevant in the event of the UK placing an embargo on export of vaccines produced at plants within the UK. Clause 5.1 imposes the obligation to use” best reasonable efforts” to manufacture the initial Europe doses. Cl 5.4 again refers to the use of best reasonable efforts to manufacture the vaccine at manufacturing sites within the UK, including those in the UK. This seems to be at odds with what the EU President stated on 29 January that the “best-effort” clause was only valid as long as it was not clear whether AstraZeneca could develop a vaccine.

In construing cl. 13(e) reference needs to be made back to cl.5.1 in determining what “conflicts with or is inconsistent in any material respect with the terms of this Agreement or that would impede the complete fulfilment of its obligations under this Agreement.”

Under clauses 18.4/5 the contract is subject to Belgian Law and Belgian jurisdiction.

“5.1 Initial Europe Dose. AstraZeneca shall use its Best Reasonable efforts to manufacture the Initial Europe Doses within the EU for distribution, and to deliver to the Distribution  Hubs, following Eu marketing authorization, as set forth more full in Section 7. Approximately…..2020 Q1 2021 and (iii) the remainder of the Initial Europe Doses by the end of …..

5.4 Manufacturing Sites. AstraZeneca shall use its Best Reasonable Efforts to manufacture the Vaccine at manufacturing sites located within the EU ( which for the purpose of this Section 5.4. only shall include the United Kingdom) and may manufacture the Vaccine in non-Eu facilities, if appropriate, to accelerate supply of the  Vaccine in Europe….

13 Representations and Warranties.

AstraZeneca represents, warrants and covenants to the Commission and the Participating Member States that:

(e) it is not under any obligation, contractual or otherwise, to any Person or third party in respect of the Initial Europe Doses or that conflicts with or is inconsistent in any material respect with the terms of this Agreement or that would impede the complete fulfilment of its obligations under this Agreement.

18.7. No liability of either party for failure or delay caused by or results from “events beyond the reasonable control of the non-performing party including…embargoes, shortages…(except to the extent such delay results from the breach by the non-performing Party or any of its Affiliates of any term or condition of this Agreement.

The situation or event must not be attributable to negligence on the part of the parties or on the part of the subcontractors.

The non-performing Party shall notify the other Party of such force majeure promptly following such occurrence takes place by giving written notice to the other Party stating the nature of the event, its anticipated  duration (to the extent known) and any action being taken to avoid or minimize its effect. The suspension of performance shall be of no greater scope and no longer durations than is necessary and the non-performing Party shall use Best Reasonable Efforts to remedy its inability to perform and limit any damage.”

Canada and the UK are the countries that have ordered the most vaccines per head of population at 9.6 and 5.5 per person respectively. The figure for the African Union is 0.2 per person.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/jan/29/canada-and-uk-among-countries-with-most-vaccine-doses-ordered-per-person

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Professor Simon Baughen

Professor Simon Baughen was appointed as Professor of Shipping Law in September 2013 (previously Reader at the University of Bristol Law School). Simon Baughen studied law at Oxford and practised in maritime law for several years before joining academia. His research interests lie mainly in the field of shipping law, but also include the law of trusts and the environmental law implications of the activities of multinational corporations in the developing world. Simon's book on Shipping Law, has run to seven editions (soon to be eight) and is already well-known to academics and students alike as by far the most learned and approachable work on the subject. Furthermore, he is now the author of the very well-established practitioner's work Summerskill on Laytime. He has an extensive list of publications to his name, including International Trade and the Protection of the Environment, and Human Rights and Corporate Wrongs - Closing the Governance Gap. He has also written and taught extensively on commercial law, trusts and environmental law. Simon is a member of the Institute of International Shipping and Trade Law, a University Research Centre within the School of Law, and he currently teaches at Swansea on the LLM in:Carriage of Goods by Sea, Land and Air; Charterparties Law and Practice; International Corporate Governance.

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