Something new for May and Trump’s in-trays. ICJ rules on UK’s retention of administration over the Chagos Archipelago

 

The UK’s decolonisation of Mauritius saw the detachment of the Chagos Archipelago which remained under UK administration. The inhabitants of the area were forcibly removed from the area which became the site of a US military base pursuant to an agreement in 1966 between the US and the UK.

On Monday the International Court of Justice gave its advisory opinion as requested by resolution 71/292 of the UN General Assembly on the following two questions relating to the UK’s process of decolonization of Mauritius in 1968

(a) “Was the process of decolonization of Mauritius lawfully completed when Mauritius was granted independence in 1968, following the separation of the Chagos Archipelago from Mauritius and having regard to international law, including obligations reflected in General Assembly resolutions 1514 (XV) of 14 December 1960, 2066 (XX) of 16 December 1965, 2232 (XXI) of 20 December 1966 and 2357 (XXII) of 19 December 1967?”;

The ICJ’s opinion is that the detachment of the Chagos Archipelago from Mauritius was not carried out in accordance with international law. Although the colony of Mauritius agreed in principle to such a detachment, the Court considered that this detachment was not based on the free and genuine expression of the will of the people concerned.

 

(b) “What are the consequences under international law, including obligations reflected in the above-mentioned resolutions, arising from the continued administration by the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland of the Chagos Archipelago, including with respect to the inability of Mauritius to implement a programme for the resettlement on the Chagos Archipelago of its nationals, in particular those of Chagossian origin?”

 

The ICJ concluded that the UK’s continued administration of the Chagos Archipelago constitutes a wrongful act entailing the international responsibility of that State. The UK Kingdom has an obligation to bring to an end its administration of the Chagos Archipelago as rapidly as possible, and that all Member States must co-operate with the United Nations to complete the decolonization of Mauritius. The resettlement on the Chagos Archipelago of Mauritian nationals, including those of Chagossian origin, is an issue relating to the protection of the human rights of those concerned, which should be addressed by the General Assembly during the completion of the decolonization of Mauritius.

 

No set-off rule does not apply to freight forwarding contract.

 

More developments on the no-set off rule in The “Aries” [1977] 1 WLR 185 (HL), which bars set-off against freight claims. As noted in this blog,     https://iistl.blog/2017/11/22/in-the-air-with-the-aries-freight-no-set-off-rule-also-applies-to-air-carriage/     the rule was held to extend to carriage by air in Schenker Ltd v Negocios Europa Ltd [2018] 1 WLR 718.

 

In Globalink Transportation and Logistics Worldwide LLP v DHL Project & Chartering Ltd [2019] EWHC 225 (Comm) (19 February 2019), it was held that the rule does not apply to freight forwarding contracts under which the forwarder has contracted to arrange carriage rather than to act as the carrier.

Sinopec engaged DHL to arrange the carriage of large items of plant and machinery from China to Kazakhstan. DHL sub-contracted the arrangement of carriage from the Black Sea onwards to Globalink. One of the barges involved was delayed and it was then fount that its draught was too deep to enable it to complete the final leg of the voyage before the Ural-Caspian canal closed for the winter, resulting in the cargo having to be stored until the Spring when Globalink were engaged to arrange completion of the carriage.

DHL refused to pay the two last instalments due under its contract with Globalink arguing a set-off of its counter claims for breach of contract arising out of the delays with the second barge.

Nicholas Vineall QC held that:

“the rule in The Aries does not extend, and should not be extended, to cover the services provided by a freight forwarding agent, when those services are to arrange the carriage of goods. It is not suggested that parties to freight forwarding contracts invariably contract on the assumed basis that no set off is available, and I see no justification for extending the ambit of a rule which is, in Lord Simon’s phrase, a pre-Cambrian outcrop, beyond contracts of carriage and into a new – albeit adjacent – area. To do so would run counter to the general principle of the law which is that a cross claim can in principle operate as a defence by way of set off. I see no basis upon which it could properly be open to me to extend the rule in The Aries into a new area.” [61]

However, in Britannia Distribution v Factor Pace [1998] 2 Lloyds Rep 420, it was held that freight forwarders acting as agents had the benefit of the no set-off rule to the extent that they could show that the sum of which they sought payment was in respect of freight that they had paid to a carrier.

Accordingly, as regards US$113,000 of the US$1.65 million total claimed that could be shown to be freight payable by Globalink to a carrier, an order for payment should be made, conditional on proof of payment by Globalink

 

Prove it. No damages for redelivery with dirty holds

 

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London Arbitration 1/19 shows that owners need to substantiate a claim for cleaning dirty holds after redelivery under a time charter. The vessel was chartered on an amended NYPE 1946 form for “2–3 laden legs of minimum duration 40 days”. Line 22 of the charterparty provided for the carriage of “any ordinary cargo” with an additional clause containing various cargo exclusions and restrictions including a stipulation that coal was not to be the last cargo. The charter also provided “Charterers shall have the option of redelivering the Vessel without cleaning of holds against paying the Owners a lumpsum of USD5,000 lumpsum, including removal of dunnage/bark/debris.”

In breach of charter the final voyage was for a full cargo of anthracite, following which the vessel was redelivered to the owners without any cleaning of the holds. The owners then used the crew to clean the holds which took nine days. The vessel’s next employment commenced two days later.

The owners claimed to be compensated at the hire rate for the time spent cleaning the cargo holds following the redelivery of the vessel, some 9.3854 days. The charterers submitted that there was no legal basis for the owners’ method of assessment of their damages claim as being effectively an extended period of hire. The owners had not provided any evidence of any cleaning operations, or of losses or extra costs. There was no evidence of any possible follow-on fixture being missed. No details had been provided of the cleaning operation which was said to have occupied more than nine days. The charterers accepted that payment of US$5,000 for redelivery with unclean holds was due to the owners but denied that any further compensation was due.

The tribunal held that the only possible conclusion to be drawn from the absence of any evidence of losses or extra costs incurred by the owners as a result of their having to clean the cargo holds had to be that none were in fact incurred, and that the owners’ claim therefore had to fail. Owners’ claim was dismissed.

 

 

 

Bareboat charters — keep your paperwork up to date

Life can be demanding for bareboat charterers, whether they are simply chartering in, or using a bareboat charter from a bank as a financing device.

In Silverburn Shipping v Ark Shipping [2019] EWHC 376 (Comm) owners under a Barecon1989 charter had suspicions as to their Korean charterers’ ability and intention to look after the vessel properly, and terminated the charter. One reason they gave was that the charterer had allowed the BV classification to lapse a short time before the vessel went into dry dock, thus breaking its obligation under Clause 9 to “keep the Vessel with unexpired classification of the class … and with other required certificates in force at all times”. Arbitrators refused to order the immediate redelivery of the vessel, holding that the duty to maintain class was not absolute, but rather to renew any expired entry in a reasonable time, and in adition that the duty to maintain the vessel in class was an intermediate term and not a condition.

On a s.69 appeal, Carr J disagreed. She saw no reason to read the obligation to keep the vessel in class as anything other than an absolute duty. Further, while accepting that the oft-emphasised requirement of commercial certainty could be over-used and could not “be deployed as some trump card” (a bon mot at para.[53] that is likely to find its way quickly into textbooks and counsel’s argument), she decided that the duty to keep in class was a condition of the contract, Breach of it could be serious in respect of the tradeability of the ship, and affect insurance, ship mortgage and flag: entry in class was moreover a black-and-white criterion with no shades of grey which was redolent of the idea of a condition.

This is something that needs to be taken seriously by charterers. Although the wording of Clause 13 of Barecon2017 differs slightly from the 1989 version, any discrepancy is minor and Carr J’s reasoning would, we suggest, continue to apply. Moreover, the right to terminate a bareboat charter can have considerable effects, particularly in the case of a financing charter with a purchase option: once the charter goes, so does the option. True, if the grounds for termination were wholly technical, in theory the court would have a right to relieve a bareboat charterer from forfeiture (The Jotunheim [2005] 1 Lloyd’s Rep. 181); but this is a difficult jurisdiction to persuade it to exercise, particularly in the face of an agreement for termination entered into by commercially-savvy parties. Charterers and borrowers, you have been warned.

The Saga Continues- What Really Happened to the Brillante Virtuoso?

The Brillante Virtuoso was sailing from Ukraine to China with a cargo of fuel oil when she was boarded by pirates off Gulf of Aden on 5 July 2011. The pirates directed the vessel to Somalia but when the engine stopped and could not be re-started, they allegedly placed a detonator in the engine room causing a huge damage to the vessel. The vessel was insured for $US 55 million with an additional $US 22 million increased cover with ten Lloyd’s underwriters. The underwriters refused to indemnify the assured (Suez Fortune Investments Ltd). The assured and its bank (Pireus Bank AE) brought a claim against the insurers. In the first stage of the trial, the claimants were successful and Flaux, J, (as he then was) held that the vessel was a constructive total loss under s. 60(2)(i) of the Marine Insurance Act 1906 as she was damaged by an insured peril and the cost of repairs would exceed the insured value of the ship when repaired [2015] EWHC 42 (Comm). The insurers argued unsuccessfully that in taking into account the repair value of the damage, the cost of repairs at China should be taken into account. The claimants, on the other hand, argued that the repairs were completed in Dubai and the cost incurred at Dubai should be taken into account even though the cost of repairs in Dubai was 17.5 % more than the cost of repairs in China. Flaux, J, held that that the appropriate location for repairs will depend on the individual circumstances of the case. In this case, he was of the view that Dubai was the most appropriate place for repairs taking into account i) risks that will be associated with further towage to China; ii) cost of insurance for the tow; iii) loss of income for additional period of time; and iv) reputation of yards (not only with regard to the quality of workmanship but also accuracy of cost estimates and the risk of delay).                        

The Brillante Virtuoso after the incident!

The second stage of the trial which will determine the issues of liability of the insurers commenced on 18 February 2019. Parties have different views of what happened to the Brillante Virtuoso in July 2011. The owners argue that the attack was carried out by the pirates who were or used to be members of the Yemeni navy or coast guard. The insurers, on the other hand, put forward the view that the attack was staged by the owners of the ship so this is a case of “wilful misconduct” of the assured. The insurers also rely on other defences, such as breach of various warranties in the policy. It is expected that this will be a lengthy trial but hopefully we shall finally find out what really happened to The Brillante Virtuoso.

Bill of lading shipper liable for sums due under incorporated head charter.

 

In Singapore Arbitration 1/19 a fraudulent broker purported to charter to shipowners on behalf of X and then sub-chartered to Z. Under the charter to X 100% freight was to be paid within six days of signing and release of bills of lading. The cargo was loaded and a bill of lading was issued to Z as  Z, incorporating all the terms and conditions of the charter and stating ‘freight payable as per charterparty dated 9 November 2010’.  Both charters bore that date. The broker received 95% freight from Z and paid part of that to owners in respect of freight under the X head charter. Owners later claim the unpaid balance of freight, and loading port demurrage, under the X charter from Z as bill of lading shipper. The owners had discharged into a port authority warehouse but had lost their lien when receivers managed to take delivery without payment of sums due under the charter with X. Owners commenced arbitration in Singapore against Z under the bill of lading.

The tribunal held that it did have jurisdiction to determine which of two charters with the same date was incorporated into the bill of lading. Both charters were subject to English law. Applying the San Nicholas it was the head charter that was incorporated.  Notwithstanding the transfer of the bill of lading, the shipper’s liability remained due to section 3(3) COGSA 1992.  Owners did not have to give credit for what Z had paid, but only for what they had received. Owners could not be criticised for having failed to act with due diligence once the balance due under the charter with X came due and had not been received. Owners acted reasonably in discharging into a port authority warehouse. The unfortunate Z was liable for the sums claimed by owners.

Are fall in value claims due to delay and deviation “Cargo Claims” ?

 

 

This issue arose in London Arbitration 4/19 under a charter on NYPE form which incorporated the Inter-Club Agreement 1984 with any subsequent modification or replacement. The parties agreed to extend time for six months under an addendum which contained cl.6 providing that charterers would be fully liable for all cargo claims, howsoever caused, including seaworthiness. During the extended charter period the vessel diverted to Goa and spent 36 days there. Charterers then deducted $295,000 from hire being what they had paid receivers in respect of financial losses due to a fall in the sound arrived value of the cargo due to the deviation to and delay at Goa. Although “cargo claims” could as a matter of language be restricted to claims for physical loss or damage, clause 6 had to be interpreted in the light of the Inter-Club Agreement which was also part of the charter and in particular the definition of “cargo claims” contained in the 1996 Agreement as “claims for loss, damage, shortage…overcarriage of or delay to cargo.” Charterer’s claim therefore related to a “cargo claim” for which they were fully liable under the terms of cl.6.

Anti-suit injunction against non-party to contract

Qingdao Huiquan Shipping Company v Shanghai Dong He Xin Industry Group Co Ltd  QBD [2018] EWHC 3009 (Comm) involved a claim for an anti-suit injunction against a non-party to a contract containing a submission to English law and London arbitration. Owners concluded a settlement with cargo receivers whereby the latter paid for the lifting of a lien over cargo which the owners had exercised following time charterers’ default in paying h ire. The agreement was subject to English law and provided for London arbitration. The settlement provided that the receivers authorised agent, SDHX, which was not a party to the agreement, would make the payment. Three years later SDHX sued owners in a Chinese court claiming repayment of those sums. It alleged that there was an oral agreement between itself and the owners. In December 2017 the Qindao Shinan District Court decided that the dispute constituted a maritime dispute, and that the matter should be transferred to the Qingdao Maritime Court to decide on the validity of the London arbitration clause. SDHX’s appeal was dismissed by the Qindao Intermediate Maritime Court which stated that one of the foundations of SDHX’s claim was the settlement agreement between owners and the receivers.

In August 2018 owners applied for an interim anti-suit injunction. Bryan J held that this was an appropriate cased where such an injunction could be obtained against a non-party to the contract. SDHX had sought to rely upon the terms of the Settlement Agreement in advancing its claims in the Chinese proceedings. In doing so, therefore, it had to take the burden of the arbitration clause. For the purpose of the interim relief claim the issue of whether there was an oral agreement with the owners did not need to be considered. SDHX were unable to show that there had been such excessive delay by owners in commencing proceedings that the court should not exercise its discretion. This was not a case involving considerations of comity or where there had been substantive proceedings in China which would lead to the English court second-guessing an existing ruling of a Chinese court. There was also some benefit from the clarity that had been provided by the Chinese appellate court.

Bully off. New amendments to Maritime Labour Convention now in effect.

 

On 8 January 2019 the 2016 amendments to the Maritime Labour Convention came into effect. These amend Guideline B4.3.1 concerning the provisions on occupational accidents, injuries and diseases so as to include harassment and bullying. Governments and shipowners are expected to adopt measures to improve protection for seafarers from shipboard harassment and bullying using as a reference the Guidance on Eliminating Shipboard Harassment and Bullying  jointly published by the International Transport Workers’ Federation and the International Chamber of Shipping. The amendments also allow for an extension of the validity of maritime labour certificates in circumstances where ships have passed the relevant inspection but where a new certificate cannot immediately be issued and made available on board.

Who is your neighbour? Corporate social responsibility and the tort of negligence.

In Das v. George Weston Limited, claims were made against a Canadian garment retailer, Loblaws, whose sub-suppliers, New Wave, had occupied premise in the Rana Plaza Building at the time of its collapse on  24 April 2013, and Bureau Veritas who had been employed to audit the corporate social responsibility code that Loblaws had inserted into its contracts with its suppliers and sub-suppliers. On April 23, 2013, cracks were discovered in three pillars of the structure of Rana Plaza. Local police evacuated the site and workers were sent home. Later that day, however, managers at New Wave ordered New Wave employees to return to work the following day. The next morning, April 24, 2013, New Wave advised workers that the building was safe and threatened to terminate their employment if they did not return to work.

That same morning, as a result of a power outage, the large back-up generators on the upper floors of Rana Plaza began to operate, causing substantial vibration. Around 9 a.m., Rana Plaza collapsed, killing 1,130 people and injuring 2,520 others. Those injured or killed included employees of New Wave, employees of other garment businesses operating out of Rana Plaza, and other people who happened to be in or around the building at the time of the collapse. The claimants were workers in and relatives of workers who had been killed or injured in the collapse . the action not only on behalf of employees of New Wave and their survivors, but on behalf of all persons who were in Rana Plaza at the time of the collapse and survived, the estates of all persons who died as a result of the collapse, and the family members and dependents of those who died or were injured. Claims were brought in 2015 shortly before the second anniversary of the collapse.

In 2017 Perell J dismissed the action 2017 ONSC 4129. The claims for death and personal injury were a time barred, save for claimants born after 22 April 1996, under the law of Bangladesh which was the governing law, as the lex loci delecti. There was no plausible case for liability in tort on either party under either the law of Bangladesh (effectively English tort law) and that of Ontario.

Shortly before Christmas 2018 the Court of Appeals in Ontario upheld the decision,  2018 ONCA 1053 (CanLII).

With respect to Loblaws’ liability, the Court found that it was plain and obvious that a negligence claim against Loblaws would fail under Bangladeshi law. The facts did not amount to the type of relationship or control over New Wave’s operations by Loblaws that has been found in English law to be sufficient to establish proximity or assumption of responsibility, and to thereby impose a duty of care to protect against harm by third parties. Loblaws was not directly involved in the management of New Wave, nor in the process of manufacturing the products. Loblaws did not have control over where the manufacturing operation took place. Loblaws’ only means of controlling New Wave was through cancellation of its product orders from Pearl Global for non-compliance with the CSR Standards. Nor was there any pleaded history of Loblaws using that lever to enforce any change in New Wave’s operations. The social audits required by Loblaws the limited social audits did not and were not intended to cover any structural issues in the New Wave factories and there was therefore no basis for any reliance on Loblaws or Bureau Veritas with respect to the structure of the Rana Plaza premises.

Similarly, the Court held that the judge correctly held that it was plain and obvious that the appellants’ pleaded claim in negligence against Bureau Veritas would fail under Bangladeshi law.

The vicarious liability claim also failed. It had not been pleaded that New Wave was acting as agent for, or on behalf of, Loblaws in conducting its operations. The exceptional circumstances in which an enterprise can be vicariously liable for the misdeeds of independent contractors were not present here. Loblaws was a retailer not a garment manufacturer and was not an enterprise engaged in a hazardous or inherently dangerous industry. It had no control over how its supplier and the sub-supplier carried on their manufacturing business or treated their employees.

Two other interesting cases on corporate liability for the acts of third parties were heard last month before the Supreme Court in Canada and the UK.

The former is the appeal in Araya v Nevsun Resources Ltd, 2017 BCCA 401, a claim against a Canadian company in respect of alleged slavery at a mine in Eritrea operated by the Eritrean government under a joint venture with it. The two issues under appeal were (a) whether the claim was barred by the Act of State doctrine and (b) whether there was a cause of action against the company for participating in a violation of customary international law.

The latter is the Vedanta Resources Plc v Lungowe noted here https://iistl.blog/2018/07/10/no-direct-liability-in-tort-for-uk-parent-company-third-anchor-defendant-decision-in-the-court-of-appeal/

This involved claims against the UK parent company and its Zambian subsidiary for environmental damage and personal injury in respect of the operation of a copper mine in Zambia. There were five issues: (i)  The proper approach to the “real issue”/”proper party” test under Practice Direction 6B para. 3.1, where a claimant seeks to sue a foreign subsidiary and a UK-domiciled parent company.

(ii) The proper approach to the exercise of discretion under CPR r.6.37(3) in mass tort claims, particularly the weight to be given to the prospect of parallel foreign proceedings as against the prejudice caused to a foreign defendant in defending mass tort claims in England and Wales.

(iii) The proper approach when determining whether there is a real risk that a claimant cannot obtain substantial justice in a foreign jurisdiction.

(iv)  The proper application of EU law principles and cases to claims brought against an English domiciled parent company, where the non-EU claimant sues both an EU-domiciled parent company and its non-EU subsidiary company.

(v) Whether to refer point (4) above to the EU Court of Justice.